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Programa

CURSO:HISTORY OF GENDER IN CHILE
TRADUCCIÓN:HISTORIA DE GÉNERO EN CHILE
SIGLA:IHI2324
CRÉDITOS:10
MÓDULOS:03
CARÁCTER:OPTATIVO 
TIPO:CÁTEDRA
CALIFICACIÓN:ESTÁNDAR 
DISCIPLINA:HISTORIA
PALABRAS CLAVE:GENDER, CONTEMPORARY HISTORY AND POLITICS


I.COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines the history of gender in Chile from the colonial period to the present. By approaching this history using gender as a category of analysis, the course will grapple with both women’s and men’s roles in Chilean society were socially constructed and how they changed over time. We will focus on how gender has shaped historical processes such as state formation and citizenship, culture, and daily life. Furthermore, we will explore gender’s intersections with sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class. The main objective of the course is that students learn how to articulate how gender as a mode of analysis offers unique perspectives that often challenge prevalent historical narratives and chronologies.


II.LEARNING OBJECTIVES

General

1.Articulate how gender can be used as a category of historical analysis. 

2.Demonstrate how ideas about ideas about men’s and women’s roles in Chilean society changed over time. 

3.Understand how gender history offers a unique perspective on Chilean history, and how it complicates overarching historical narratives.


Specific

1.Synthesize information from primary and secondary sources in order to form arguments based on historical evidence. 

2.Express arguments and knowledge clearly and concisely, in both oral and written form.


III.CONTENT

1.Unit 1
1.1.Basic concepts: Gender as a Category of Analysis
1.2.Overview of Chilean History

2.Unit 2
2.1.The Gender Order in the Long Nineteenth Century 
2.2.Colonial Chile and Independence.
2.3.State Formation and Consolidating National Identity
2.4.Workers and the Social Question
2.5.Early women’s and feminist movements

3.Unit 3
3.1.State, Society, and Culture, 1930s-1970s
3.2.Feminism and women’s suffrage
3.3.Gender, Social Reform, and the Welfare State
3.4.Modernization and Development, 1960s-1970s
3.5.The Popular Unity and the Chilean Road to Socialism
Culture and Counterculture, 1950s-1970s

4.Unit 4
4.1.The Pinochet Dictatorship, 1973-1990
4.2.Gender, Political Violence, and Human Rights Movements
4.3.Feminism as a Response to Authoritarianism

5.Unit 5
5.1.New Challenges in Democracy 
5.2.Gender and Memory Struggles
5.3.Women and Government
5.4.LGBT Movements and Experiences
5.5.Indigenous Women, Gender, and the State


IV.METHODOLOGY OF LEARNING

-Lectures

-Reading, analysis and discussion of primary sources

-Bibliographic Presentations


V.LEARNING EVALUATION

-Group pesentation on readings: 15%

-Response papers: 20%

-Mid term Exam: 20%

-Final Project proposal: 15%

-Fonal project: 30%


VI.BIBLIOGRAPHY

Required (Readings will be posted on course website.)

Barr-Melej, Patrick. Psychedelic Chile: Youth, Culture, and Politics on the Road to Socialism and Dictatorship. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.

Bunster, Ximena, “Sruviving Beyond Fear: Women and Torture in Latin America.” In: Women and Change in Latin America, eds. June Nash and Helen Safa. Boston: Bergen and Garvey, 1986.

Chambers, Sarah. Families in War and Peace: Chile from Colony to Nation. Durham: Duke University Press, 2015.

Hutchison, Elizabeth. “El Fruto Envenenado del Arbol Capitalista: Women Workers and the Prostitution of Labor in Urban Chile, 1896-1925.” Journal of Women’s History 9:4 (Winter 1998): 131-151.

Kaplan, Temma. “Acts of Testimony: Reversing the Shame and Gendering the Memory.” Signs 28:1 (Autumn 2002): 179-199.

Lavrin, Asunción. Sexuality and Marriage in Colonial Latin America. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1992.

Lavrin, Asunción. Women, Feminism, and Social Change in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay, 1890-1940. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1995.

Mallon, Florencia, “Barbudos, Warriors, and Rotos: The MIR, Masculinity, and Power in the Chilean Agrarian Reform, 1965-1974.” In: Matthew C. Gutmann, ed., Changing Men and Masculinitites in Latin America. Durham: Duke University Press, 2002.

Pieper-Mooney, Jadwiga. The Politics of Motherhood: Maternity and Women’s Rights in Twentieth-Century Chile. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2009.

Power, Margaret. Right Wing Women in Chile: Feminine Power and the Struggle Against Allende, 1964-1973. University Park: Penn State University Press, 2002.

Rosemblatt, Karin. “Charity, Rights, and Entitlement: Gender, Labor, and Welfare in Early Twentieth-Century Chile.” Hispanic American Historical Review 81: 3-4 (2001): 555-585.

Reuque Pailallef, Rosa Isolde and Mallon, Florencia. When a Flower is Reborn: Life and Times of a Mapuche Feminist. Durham: Duke University Press, 2002.

Scott, Joan Wallach. “Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis.” American Historical Review 91:5 (1986): 1053-1075.

Tinsman, Heidi. Buying into the Regime: Grapes and Consumption in Cold War Chile and the United States. Durham: Duke University Press, 2014.

Valenzuela, Sebastián, and Correa, Teresa. “Press Coverage and Public Opinion on Women Candidates: The Case of Chile’s Michelle Bachelet.” International Communication Gazette 71:3 (April 2008): 203-223.

Complementary 

Deutsch, Sandra McGee. “Gender and Sociopolitical Change in Latin America”, Hispanic American Historical Review 71 (May 1991): pp. 259-262, 292-306.

Hutchison, Elizabeth, et. al. The Chile Reader: History, Culture, Politics. Durham: Duke University Press, 2013.

Klubock, Thomas Miller. “Writing the History of Women and Gender in Twentieth-Century Chile”. Hispanic American Historical Review 81:3-4 (August-November 2001): 498-518.

Tinsman, Heidi. “A Paradigm of our Own: Joan Scott in Latin American History”. American Historical Review 113, no. 5 (December 2008): pp. 1357-1374.


PONTIFICIA UNIVERSIDAD CATÓLICA DE CHILE
INSTITUTO DE HISTORIA / NOVIEMBRE 2018