Imprimir

Programa

CURSO:LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE AND ETHNICITY
TRADUCCIÓN:CULTURA Y ETNICIDAD LATINOAMERICANO
SIGLA:SOL221
CRÉDITOS:10
MÓDULOS:02
CARÁCTER:OPTATIVO
TIPO:CÁTEDRA
CALIFICACIÓN:ESTÁNDAR
DISCIPLINA:SOCIOLOGÍA 
PALABRAS CLAVE:SOCIOLOGÍA, LATINOAMÉRICA, ETNICIDAD, CULTURA
NIVEL FORMATIVO:PREGRADO


I.COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course provides students with a general understanding of Latin American Culture and Ethnicity since independence in the 19th century but with particular attention to more recent transformations in the late 20th century. During the course, we will cover four key dimensions of cultural processes in the region: religious symbolism, political culture, education, and ethnicity. Students will be introduced to the main sociological perspectives and Latin American intellectuals that have contributed to the analysis of these four dimensions. Students will be able to use these theoretical frameworks to analyse cultural changes in the region and conduct independent research. 


II.LEARNING OBJECTIVES

1.Understand religious, political, educational, and ethnic dimensions of Latin American culture. 

2.Develop writing and argumentative skills through essays that combine theoretical arguments with empirical evidence.

3.Foster communicative and argumentative skills through seminar presentations.


III.CONTENTS

1.Religious symbolism and the question of Latin America
1.1.Baroque and modernity
1.2.Marianism and challenges to Catholicism
1.3.The persistent problem of violence

2.Political culture and the promise of the future
2.1.Civilisation and Barbarism: the liberal project of the 19th century
2.2.The state and political populism
2.3.Civil society and social trust
	
3.Education
3.1.Paolo Freire and liberating pedagogies
3.2.Popular Education in Latin America
3.3.Inequalities in Latin American education 

4.Ethnicity 
4.1.Science-Fiction and ideas about race in the 19th and 20th Century
4.2.Discourses of mixture (mestizaje) in Latin America
4.3.Contemporary indigenous identities and politics


IV.LEARNING METHODOLOGY

-Lectures.

-Seminars. 
	
	
V.ASSESSMENT

-Seminar presentation: 20%

-Essay 1: 40%

-Essay 2: 40% 


VI.BIBLIOGRAPHY

Required

Banton, Michael. 1997. Racial Theories, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Bergman, Marcelo. 2009. Tax Evasion and the Rule of Law in Latin America: The Political Culture of Cheating and Compliance in Argentina y Chile. Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.

Centeno, Miguel Angel. 2002. Blood and Debt: War and the Nation-State in Latin America. Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.

Freire, Paolo. 1980. Pedagogy of the Oppressed. New York:Conllinuum

Kane, Liam. 2000. Popular Education and Social Change in Latin America. Latin America Bureau; UK ed.

Oxhorn, Philip. 1998. “The Social Foundations of Latin America’s Recurrent Populism: Problems of Popular Sector Class Formation y Collective Action.” Journal of Historical Sociology 11(2):212–46.

Paz, Octavio. 1986. The Labyrinth of Solitude. New York: Grove Weidenfeld.

Sarmiento, Faustino. 2003. Facundo: Civilization and Barbarism. Translated by Kathleen Ross. University of California Press.

Stevens, Evelyn. 1973. "Machismo and Marianismo". Society 10(6):57-63.

Véliz, Claudio. 1980. The Centralist Tradition of Latin America. Princeton University Press.

Wade, Peter. (2010 (2nd Ed) Race and Ethnicity in Latin America, London: Pluto Press.

Complimentary

Adelman, Jeremy. 1999. “The Problem of Persistence in Latin American History.” Pp. 1–13 in Colonial Legacies: the Problem of Persistence in Latin American History, edited by Jeremy Adelman. New York: Routledge.

Bengoa, Jose. 2000. La emergencia indígena en América Latina. Santiago: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Canessa, Andrew. 2006. “Todos somos indígenas: Towards a new language of national political identity”, Bulletin of Latin American research, 25(2): 241-263.

Centeno, Miguel Angel. 1997. “Blood and Debt: War and Taxation in Nineteenth-Century Latin America.” The American Journal of Sociology 102(6):1565–1605.

Cooper Stoll, L. 2014. “Constructing the color-blind classroom: teachers’ perspectives on race and schooling”, Race Ethnicity and Education, 17(5):688-705

Ellsworth, E. 1989. “Why Doesn’t this feel Empowering? Working through the Repressive Myths of Critical Pedagogy”, Harvard Educational Review, 59(3): 297-324.

Freire, P. & Macedo, D. (1995). Culture, Language, and Race. Harvard Educational Review. 65(3), 377-402

Jackson, J. & Warren, K. 2005. “Indigenous movements in Latin America, 1992-2004: controversies, ironies, new directions”, Annual Review of Anthropology, 34: 549-573

Moreno Figueroa, Monica. 2010. “Distributed Intensities: Whiteness, Mestizaje and the Logics of Mexican Racism”, Ethnicities, 10 (3): 387–401

Oxhorn, Philip. 2006. “Conceptualizing Civil Society from the Bottom Up: A Political Economy Perspective.” Pp. 59–86 in Civil Society y Democracy in Latin America, editado por Richard Feinberg, Carlos H Waisman, y Leon Zamosc. London: Palgrave-Macmillan.

Torche, Florencia y Eduardo Valenzuela. 2011. “Trust and Reciprocity: A Theoretical Distinction of the Sources of Social Capital.” European Journal of Social Theory 14(2):181–98. 


PONTIFICIA UNIVERSIDAD CATÓLICA DE CHILE
INSTITUTO DE SOCIOLOGÍA / NOVIEMBRE 2018