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Programa

CURSO: ECOLOGY: A CHALLENGE TO THE GREAT RELIGIONS
TRADUCCIÓN: ECOLOGÍA: UN DESAFÍO A LAS GRANDES RELIGIONES
SIGLA: TTF042
CRÉDITOS: 10
MODULOS: 02	
REQUISITOS: SIN REQUISITOS
CARÁCTER: OPTATIVO
DISICPLINA: TEOLOGÍA


I. DESCRIPTION 

This course, to be presented in English, will address the historical development of ecology and the growing sensitivity of the greater religious communities in the world to the necessity of a change in paradigm for the humanity-nature relationship.  It will familiarize the course participants with the basic concepts of this science—ecosystems, climate change, biodiversity—and analyze the core problems that the Enlightenment model presents to this relationship, as well as the resources that diverse faith communities can offer to the ecological movement.


II. OBJECTIVES
	
General:

1. Establish the theological dimension of ecology.

2. Discover the role that the world’s great religions and spiritual traditions can play in the development of ecology in our own times.


Specific:

1. Know and understand the role of faith communities in the development of a variety of humanity-nature paradigms.

2. Show how ecology presents a fundamental theological question, a true “sign of the times.”

3. Develop the ability to know and analyze the principal tendencies and schools of the modern ecological movement.

4. Promote attitudes of appreciation and support for a future collaborative convergence between faith communities and the ecological movement.


III. CONTENTS

1. Introduction-The environmental crisis and the need for a change in the  humanity-nature paradigm.

2. Ecology, introduction and overview.

3. Creation—the Judeo-Christian biblical foundations for the theological concept.

4. The “goods of Creation” in the thought of Augustine and Thomas Aquinas.

5. The “integrity of Creation” in modern Christian theology: Orthodox, Catholic, Protestant.

6. Latin American perspectives on ecology: religious, philosophical, symbolic.

7. Islamic Environmental Ethics.

8. Ahimsa: Hindu, Buddhist and Sikh contributions.

9. Daoism and Nature.

10. The cosmologies of the Original Peoples in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Oceania.

11. The concept of the “rights” of nature and ecological justice.

12. Poverty and the destruction of the environment.

13. The anthropocentric problem.

14. Ecumenical, interreligious and intercommunity cooperation.

15. The concept of “bio-community.”


IV. METHODOLOGY

- Class lectures.
- Required readings.
- Preparation of original monographs.
- Visits to class by representatives of the Great Religions.
- Interdisciplinary dialogue.


V. EVALUATION

- Two tests during the semester on assigned readings and class materials—20% of the final grade, each.
- A monograph of five pages on a specific theme within the course’s field of study, approved beforehand by the professor, to be handed in at the end of the semester—30% of the final grade.
- Final exam, 30% of the final grade.
- A minimum attendance at class of 85% is required.


VI. BIBLIOGRAPHY

Minimum:

Gottlieb, Roger S., ed. The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Ecology (selected articles).  New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

McDonagh, Sean.  Pasión por la Tierra. Bilbao: Ediciones Mensajero, 2000.

McDonagh, Sean.	The Greening of the Church.  Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1990.

Santmire, H. Paul.Nature Reborn: The Ecological and Cosmic Promise of Christian Theology.  Minneapolis, Minnesota, EE.UU: Fortress, 2000.


Complementary:

Comission on Developing Countries and Global Change. For Earth’s Sake: A Report from the Commission on

Developing Countries and Global Change. Ottowa, Canadá: International Development Research Center, 1992.

Consejo Episcopal Latinoamericano. Aparecida: Documento conclusivo.  Santiago de Chile: Conferencia Episcopal de Chile, 2007.

González, Mons. Carlos. Espiritualidad para una ecología cristiana integral.  Santiago de Chile: Área de Comunicaciones, Conferencia Episcopal de Chile, 
1979.

Kraft, Kenneth. Budismo solidario: Un nuevo mapa del sendero.  Santiago de Chile: Ed. Maitri, 2001.

Lipietz, Alain. ¿Qué es la ecología política?  Santiago de Chile: LOM, 2002.

Panini, Alberto. Ecología y Evangelio: Nuestra responsabilidad con la naturaleza.  Buenos Aires: Ciudad Nueva, 1996.



PONTIFICIA UNIVERSIDAD CATÓLICA DE CHILE*