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Programa

CURSO: GENERAL LINGUISTICS			    
SIGLA: LET1321
CREDITOS: 10
MODULOS: 02	
CARACTER: MINIMUM
DISCIPLINA: LINGUISTICS


I. DESCRIPTION

This course is an introduction to the theory and methods of linguistics. The main focus of the course lies in the study of the building blocks of language and the synchronic aspects of linguistics. The latter provides an overview of theories on the study of language which linguists have developed in the twentieth-century.

II. OBJECTIVES

Main
1. To show comprehension of the main aspects associated to the study of language and linguistics
2. To Describe the characteristics of human language and propose a definition of it 
3. To examine and discuss the principles underlying the main linguistic paradigms of the XXth century
4. Reflect upon the strengths and weaknesses that characterize every school of linguistics
5. To  show ability to use of concepts associated to linguistics to describe the phenomena of language in oral and written discourse

Specific
1. To identify the characteristics of human languages.
2. To discuss and reflect upon the differences between human languages and  other communication systems
3. To examine and consider critically the characteristics of oral and written modes of language
4. Describe the processes involved in language spread 
5. Identify and describe the consequences that brought the contact between language communities in the generation of language contact phenomena
6. To discuss and reflect on the foundations of the main linguistic schools of the 20th century.


III. CONTENTS

1. Language and communication
1.1. General aspects about languages
1.2. Definition and characteristics of human language
1.3. Modes of linguistic communication
1.4. Language origin/ Language variation

2. Theoretical frameworks in the study of language: 20th century linguistics in Europe
2.1. 20th century linguistics in Europe
2.2. The Geneva school: Ferdinand de Saussure
2.3. The Prague school: Roman Jakobson
2.4. The Copenhagen school: Louis Hjelmslev
2.5. The London school: M.A.K Halliday

3. Theoretical frameworks in the study of language: 20th century linguistics in The United States
3.1. 20th century linguistics in the United States 
3.1.1. Descriptivism & American structuralism: Boas/Sapir/Whorf & L. Bloomfield
3.1.2. Generative grammar: Chomsky
3.1.3. Speech act theory: Austin 
3.1.4. Cognitive linguistics: Lakoff & Johnson


IV. COURSE ORGANIZATION 

- The  professor  will  conduct  the  course  by  assigning  readings,  providing  lectures,  and  working  through problem sets. Written and oral assignments will provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate that they can apply linguistic concepts to the critical analysis of the different linguistic paradigms  


V. COURSE REQUIREMENTS
	
- Class approval depends on the presentation of oral and written tasks on its due date. Failure to submit a task on the date previously scheduled will result in the minimum grade. Oral and written tasks must show analysis, synthesis and integration of different viewpoints; therefore, the completion of reading is critical for class approval. Punctuality is absolutely necessary for the creation of a learning environment. As there is no point in your coming to classes without the reading assignments, avoid attending classes without the photocopies of your reading assignments.

V. EVALUATION

- Writing assignments 10%
- Test 1 30%
- Test 2 30%
- Theoretical paper 30%


VI. BIBLIOGRAPHY
  
Austin, J. (1962). How to do things with words. New york: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

Bloomfield, L. (1961). Language. New York : Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

Boas, F. (1940). Race, language and culture. New York: Macmillan

Whorf, Benjamin Lee. (1997). "The Relation of Habitual Thought and Behavior to Language." In Sociolinguistics: A Reader and Coursebook. Ed. Nikolas Coupland and Adam Jaworski. Houndmills: Macmillan, (pp.443-463)

Chomsky, N. (1983). Cartesian linguistics: a chapter in the history of rationalist thought. New York: University Press of America 

Firth, J. (1957). Papers in linguistics. London: Oxford University Press.

Hockett, C. (1958). A course in modern linguistics. New York: Macmillan.

Jakobson, R. & Halle, M. (1956). Fundamentals of Language. Berlin, New York: Mouton de gruyter. 

Sapir, E. (1949). Language: An introduction to the study of speech. New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

Saussure, F. (1966). Course in general linguistics. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Searle, J. (1979). Expression and meaning: studies in the theory of speech acts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.  



PONTIFICIA UNIVERSIDAD CATÓLICA DE CHILE
FACULTAD DE LETRAS / JUNIO 2012